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When weekend promotional giveaways at a Las Vegas casino were delayed due to customs issues, GlobalTranz expedited shipping picked up the load from the port and transported it to the casino in time for the big event. 

Traditionally expedited shipping has been used to solve these kinds of challenges. When a shortage of materials or components could shut down the production line, or impact a big event, expedited delivery saves the day. However, shippers across all industries are also finding that customized expedited shipping services can help them meet the increasing delivery demands from consumer and business buyers. 

Expedited trucking typically operates with three levels of vehicles: straight box trucks, vans, and hot shots or heavy-duty pickups towing trailers such as boxes and flatbeds. Expedited shipping carriers don’t face the same capacity challenges that leave truckload and LTL carriers to increase rates while scrambling to fulfill their commitments. 

Here’s a look at why more shippers are looking at expedited shipping as an integral component of their supply chains. 

  1. Expedited Service Means Dedicated Service

Expedited delivery services typically involve dedicated Point A to Point B shipments of must-have products in less than truckload quantities, by truck or by air, with service guarantees. Because the vehicle is dedicated to the shipment, the rate is basically the same whether the load is one pallet or ten pallets.  

Expedited shipping services make the most sense when the product is urgent or time-critical. Basically, any commodity can move in expedited service, from manufacturing raw materials and components to food and beverage products. 

  1. Transit Times

Rates are higher than standard LTL or truckload service, but in most cases, shipping cost is not the issue. Shutting down an assembly line to save a few thousand on shipping costs doesn’t make sense. Instead, transit time is the top factor for choosing expedited shipping, although shippers value customized handling as well. 

The smaller trucks often used for expedited shipping operate under different hours of service regulations than full-size semis, so they can generally cover the same distance in less time.  

  1. Reduced Handling & Damage

With expedited truck service, the shipment moves directly from shipper to consignee in the same truck. Compare that with LTL operations that usually require cross-docking or unloading and reloading freight at a terminal. 

 With expedited shipping, there’s no en route handling, so there’s less chance of damage or loss. Of course, LTL and truckload shipping offers a high level of quality, but, expedited shipping provides a higher level of customized service.  

  1. Service Diversions

Expedited shipping services can save the day with shipment diversion. That’s when a shipment is moving in truckload or LTL service, but it’s not moving fast enough. Perhaps an assembly line needs two days worth of parts to keep it operating until the full shipment arrives. An expedited carrier can divert all or a portion of the load and move it to the destination so the assembly line can stay open.   

  1. Better Capacity Availability

Currently, expedited trucking rates are more stable than truckload and LTL rates as carriers work through capacity challenges and productivity impacts from ELD implementation and the driver shortage. Typically expedited carriers are standing by to move your loads at rates that aren’t inflated by short-term fluctuations. 

  1. Air & Ocean Freight Experts

The GlobalTranz expedited shipping group also manages domestic and international air freight and domestic ocean freight. GlobalTranz is an indirect air carrier certified by the Transportation Security Administration (TSA). As an IAC, GlobalTranz has developed a security program that meets TSA requirements. The company is also a member of the Air Forwarders Association to keep up to date on the federal regulations. 

Shippers of high-value cargo, such as consumer electronics, often use air freight to reduce the possibility of damage and move products through their supply chains faster. 

The expedited shipping group also manages domestic ocean freight, such as moving supplies for rebuilding Puerto Rico after Hurricane Maria. 

  1. Disaster Response

In the aftermath of a storm, like the most recent Hurricane Florence, expedited shipping can be a lifesaver for your supply chain. Expedited shipping services are more agile and responsive when major roadways may be congested or closed. Large trucks must stick to approved truck routes. By using smaller vehicles, the expedited department can facilitate deliveries into natural disaster areas for relief supplies and just-in-time deliveries. We also have the option of combining air freight with ground shipping to reach disaster areas quickly.  

Also, when natural disasters occur, prioritization of available trucks goes to transporting relief and emergency supplies over standard freight, which can impact capacity. Utilizing expedited services can help mitigate capacity challenges during those times.  

Talk to Experienced Expedited Pros 

Expedited shipping can play an integrated role in your supply chain with dedicated, customized service that’s faster than other options. Work with an experienced partner like the GlobalTranz team of expedited shipping experts that connect your freight with approved, high-quality carriers.

 

Get in touch with the GlobalTranz team of expedited shipping experts; we’re ready to help you move your freight faster.

 

It’s clear that pressure on shipping capacity and rates from the ELD mandate, the ongoing driver shortage and a robust economy won’t be going away any time soon. To overcome those issues, some shippers are finding — or rediscovering — intermodal shipping service. By moving trailers and containers via rail versus over-the-road trucking, shippers can bypass capacity issues and find lower costs.

The trend has been evident as intermodal traffic volumes have been strong over the past several months. Through the first 36 weeks of 2018, intermodal rail traffic is up 6 percent over the same time last year, according to the Association of American Railroads.

Converting traffic to intermodal shipping services makes sense for many shippers. Here’s a look at some important aspects of intermodal shipping you should consider.

Flexibility

Converting traffic to intermodal works best for shippers who are able to trade longer transit times for lower rates. It’s especially efficient when moving from a major market near an intermodal terminal to another major market with facilities, cutting down on drayage time and costs on either end of the shipment.

Suits more traffic

A few years ago, intermodal traffic was most efficient for moves of 700 miles or more. That was the upper limit of a one-day truck move, so it made sense to make longer hauls by rail. However, now with the ELD mandate, drivers may not be able to make the same moves in one day. What used to be a one-day truck move is now a two-day move. Now, if shifting to intermodal adds only one additional day, then the lower cost might be an attractive tradeoff. We’re finding that intermodal is attractive for shipments in the 500-600 mile range now, such as between major markets on the East Coast.

Improved service

Railroads are investing billions in improving intermodal infrastructure and services. New and expanded terminals, improvement of overall network velocity and removing inefficiencies that delay transit times are top priorities for railroads to ensure they retain traffic they’ve recently gained from over-the-road trucks.

Long-term conversion

If shippers adapt their supply chains to the pace of intermodal, they may be able to shift some of their products to ship earlier in the year to avoid peak congestion and build longer transit times into their strategies. Converting at least a portion of traffic to intermodal can pay off in long-term savings as OTR rates rise.

Drayage capacity

Intermodal drayage is not immune to capacity issues. Drayage, the truck movement on either end of the rail shipment from the terminal to origin or destination, still relies on drivers who can have their choice of freight right now. If a shipment requires multiple stops, or a 200-mile drive to pick up or drop off, the driver may be less willing to sign on for the move.

Transit times

Intermodal shipping works best when there’s some flexibility in transit time. If shippers can forecast freight needs a few days further out, they can build in time for intermodal service. With some additional planning, shippers can reduce costs with intermodal.

Ultimately, it’s up to the shipper to choose the best mode to serve their supply chain. Some freight is very time sensitive and should stay with an over-the-road option. If you’d like to explore intermodal possibilities, we can help you weigh the advantages of converting traffic to intermodal and provide you custom logistics solutions that meet your supply chain goals.

 

Learn how intermodal shipping can drive consistent capacity and cost savings into your supply chain. Call 866.275.1407 or Contact Us

 

More than 80 percent of U.S. communities depend solely on trucking for delivery of their goods and commodities. In this country, we all rely on truck drivers in some way or another. Whether it’s to enjoy basic modern conveniences, receive life-sustaining medical supplies, or keep businesses thriving, our lives depend on the transportation industry and more importantly, our nation’s truck drivers. 

September 9-15, 2018 marks National Truck Driver Appreciation Week. This is an opportunity to recognize the 3.5 million trucking professionals across the country whose work is some of the most personally demanding and economically significant in the United States.  

 At GlobalTranz, we think it’s important to show truck drivers appreciation every day. We’re committed to making drivers’ lives more enjoyable on the road and helping them succeed every day of the year. Here are 5 ways shippers – and all of us in the logistics industry – can appreciate and respect truck drivers on a daily basis. 

Minimize driver wait time 

Much of a driver’s compensation is based on their ability to move loads quickly, safely and efficiently. With the ELD mandate strictly enforcing HOS rules, it’s important for shippers to run smooth dock operations and minimize the time drivers sit waiting for loading and unloading. Help drivers get in and out of facilities quickly and on the road.  

Make your facility easy and safe to access 

How easy is your facility to find? Does it come up on GPS? Is it easy to turn into without worrying about oncoming traffic or parked cars? If a driver wastes time finding your location, their job becomes unnecessarily difficult. Make sure your traffic patterns are safe and easy to maneuver and you have streamlined gate check-in procedures. 

 Be courteous and accommodating 

Ensure that you and your facility’s employees are treating drivers with respect. Provide ample parking at your loading docks and comfortable break areas and restrooms at your facilities. Offer drivers a place to rest, complete paperwork, make phone calls and get a snack or coffee while their truck is being loaded. Consider them an extension of your team. Their job is critical to getting your products to market.  

Pay freight bills quickly
With 350,000 owner operators, many truck drivers are also operating their own small business, and quick payment can be the essence to their success. It’s important to pay owner-operators and carriers quickly and accurately. Freightwaves.com suggests the best way to accomplish this is using a TMS that integrates clean data between carriers and shippers. 

Get involved 

The truck driving profession is personally demanding. Working fourteen hours a day, and spending prolonged time away from family are sacrifices truck drivers make to help keep the economy moving. There are several non-profit organizations, like Trucker Charity and Meals for 18 Wheels, devoted to mentoring, coaching and providing meals and assistance for drivers and their families. Consider getting involved with and learning more about these organizations and other causes supporting truck drivers. 

From all of us at GlobalTranz, we say, “thank you” to the men and women who keep America moving. #ThankATruckDriver every day.

It’s no secret that trucking capacity is strained. The U.S. economy is growing, creating very strong freight demand. At the same time, the ongoing driver shortage and decreased productivity from ELDs is resulting in more loads than available trucks.  

Spot market rates are up 20 to 35 percent over 2017, and analysts expect tight capacity and higher costs to continue into 2019. 

 During this historic time, shippers are looking for solutions to mitigate dynamic market conditions and keep their logistics operations running smoothly. Here are 5 ways shippers can successfully navigate the capacity crunch. 

1.  Adopt TMS Technology 

A web-based TMS (transportation management system), with a network of pre-qualified carriers, centralizes the freight procurement process and provides end-to-end visibility.  

A TMS helps businesses make routing decisions by matching freight with the best carriers, lanes, rates and transit service.  GlobalTranz develops a TMS that uses machine learning to identify and optimize available capacity and match it to shipper demand. This technology helps shippers lower risk, optimize routes and increase service levels in all market conditions. 

Business intelligence and predictive analytics tools within a TMS also help shippers make data-driven decisions that manage disruptions, reduce downtime and effectively plan and budget overall logistics spend. 

2. Leverage Carrier Relationships

By leveraging carrier relationships, 3PLs are able to align available freight to carriers’ preferred lanes and backhaul needs. Logistics service providers like GlobalTranz can identify opportunities that align with carriers’ networks and provide consistent volume to minimize empty moves.

3. Utilize Dedicated Capacity Networks 

3PLs like GlobalTranz have relationships with a vast network of carriers and shippers and can align all types of shipper requests and schedules with carriers at contracted rates. Dedicated capacity provides consistent capacity for 3PLs that meets service, compliance and cost requirements for contracted or dedicated shipper business.  

Dedicated capacity networks are mutually beneficial for carriers, shippers and 3PLs alike. Carriers maintain frequent volumes and alleviate 3PLs from sourcing spot-market capacity during market shifts; as a result, shippers see improved service levels for on-time pick-up and delivery.  

4. Become a Shipper of Choice

For the first time in many years, carrier providers are in a position to choose which shippers they work with, giving rise to the shipper of choice” environment. Shippers who provide better experiences for carriers can reap long-term benefits in the form of higher service levels, fewer claims, and better rates. To become a shipper carriers want to work with, it’s important to run efficient and friendly dock operations, reduce driver wait times, provide comfortable breakroom and restroom accommodations, and pay carriers quickly and accurately. 

5. Use Multimodal Solutions 

Treat each shipment as a move, independent of the modes and vendors required to transport. With truckload capacity tight, using a variety of multi-modal solutions, like combining rail with truckload and LTL, helps mitigate capacity challenges while reducing overall costs. 

 

Learn how the right combination of people, processes and technology can help you mitigate capacity challenges. Call 866-275-1407 or Contact Us

 

Shipping rates for cross-border Mexico loads are fluctuating for the same reasons we are experiencing in the U.S. – the ELD mandate, rising prices, chronic driver shortage and soaring consumer demand. One factor unique to cross-border trade that’s impacting the market is the extreme imbalance between southbound and northbound traffic. According to JOC.com, there are not enough southbound trailers to match rising northbound demand for trailer space.

Mexico is an enormous market for both imports and exports. USTR.gov notes that in 2017 “The U.S. imported $340.3 billion worth of goods from Mexico, and exports to Mexico totaled $276.2 billion,” making Mexico the United States’ third largest market for both imports and exports in 2017. Despite recent tariffs imposed on some goods, trade flow continues to be strong across the U.S.-Mexico border.

For cross-border shippers, the export-import landscape has become exceedingly complex. Here are 5 tips to better manage your costs and processes:

1. Provide Essential Information in Advance

Incomplete or incorrect paperwork is a common reason shipments get delayed at the border, and it’s very avoidable. When you provide all the information about your freight in advance to your logistics partner, they’re able to coordinate and prepare shipment documentation that must accompany every cross-border shipment. Make sure you provide your logistics partner with accurate shipping addresses, piece counts, pallet counts, details about the items being shipped and timelines.

2. Increase Lead Time

A 1,000-mile load going from state-to-state in the U.S. won’t have the same transit time when shipping into Mexico. Everything slows down at border crossings for routine customs clearance procedures. The more lead time your logistics partner has to book a shipment, the more leverage they have to secure the best carrier for your lane, identify efficiency improvements, negotiate rates and accommodate delivery timelines. If you have a critical northbound shipment, your logistics partners will need time to find the right carrier to handle it. Sometimes, this requires considerable deadhead, which inherently increases costs. In a capacity-constrained environment, information and time are great equalizers.

3. Hire a Good Customs Broker 

The carrier and 3PL will get your shipment to the border, and the customs broker will help you carry the ball over the goal line. Think of your customs broker as a CPA for freight. They prepare every shipment’s paperwork, so it complies with the export and import laws of U.S. and Mexico. If one form is out of place or you’re missing a signature, your freight could be delayed. Frequent communication with your customs broker is a must-have for smooth border crossing. Find a good customs broker and stick with them if they consistently provide excellent service.

4. Work with CTPAT Carriers and Partners

U.S. Customs and Border Protection (CBP) launched its Customs Trade Partnership Against Terrorism (CTPAT) program in 2001 in the aftermath of 9/11. According to the agency’s website, “CBP works with the trade community to strengthen international supply chains and improve United States border security.” CTPAT is a voluntary public-private sector partnership program for importers, carriers, consolidators, customs brokers and manufacturers. CTPAT members agree to work with CBP to “protect the supply chain, identify security gaps and implement specific security measures and best practices.”

The bottom line for shippers is when you hire companies that are in the government’s CTPAT program you lower your risk. CTPAT members are also less likely to be slowed down by CBP at U.S. entry points and will often experience shorter wait times at the border.

5. Use a Transportation Management System (TMS) for full Visibility

With so many moving parts in cross-border shipping, a TMS is critical to providing end-to-end visibility, tracking and connectivity among all parties involved. A TMS with predictive analytics and business intelligence capabilities will also enable you to use data to optimize your cross-border freight operations and identify opportunities for mode shift, consolidation and cost efficiencies.

Cut Through the Complexity and Hire Experienced Pros

There’s no doubt that cross-border shipping is a complicated business. By following our five tips here, you’ll reduce your risk and begin to optimize your processes. If you don’t have your core group of experts at your company to adequately handle logistics operations to and from Mexico, consider hiring a 3PL with significant experience in that part of the world.

GlobalTranz has a permanent office in Mexico staffed with bi-lingual logistics experts. Learn more about how we can help you cut through the complexity of cross-border Mexico shipping.

 

Learn how the right combination of people, processes and technology can drive cost savings and efficiency into your cross-border Mexico logistics. Call 52 81 8000 7633 or Contact Us

 

The first half of 2018 is in the books and it’s been a busy year for the freight community and supply chain industry. Many industry experts are reporting 2018 to be the most dynamic freight market in history. As we head into the second half of 2018, we’re featuring our top logistics stories of the year.

Shippers of Choice: Be the Customer Carriers Love to Have

In today’s capacity environment, shippers are competing against one another to book an available truck at a reasonable rate. Carriers have the choice to haul loads that are the most lucrative for their business and keep them within legal limits of HOS rules. Shippers who provide better experiences for carriers could reap long-term benefits. Read 5 ways to help transform your company into a shipper of choice.

Tips for Shippers in the New ELD Mandate Environment

If you’re a shipper, carrier or logistics company, it’s been impossible to ignore the news about the industry’s ELD mandate (Electronic Logging Device), which went into effect late last year. April 2018 was the first official month where carriers could be fined, ticketed or put out of service for non-compliance. Read how ELDs are impacting freight markets and tips for success in the new ELD Mandate environment.

Blockchain in Logistics: 10 Benefits and Why We Need Standards

Blockchain technology is considered by many to have as much potential as AI (artificial intelligence). For the logistics industry, blockchain is promising to create transparency of all documents and transactions across the freight landscape, ultimately increasing the efficiency, agility and innovation of supply chains. Read how blockchain can solve logistics inefficiencies and 10 benefits of blockchain in logistics.

The Rise of AI in Logistics

The ever-expanding field of artificial intelligence (AI) is leaving an indelible mark on every industry, logistics included. With its ability to rapidly make sense of massive data sets and automate operational processes, AI is transforming the movement of goods and creating competitive advantages for business supply chains across the globe. Read about 3 ways AI is transforming logistics management.

10 Ways to Optimize Your Freight Shipments and Save

Consulting company Capgemini recently surveyed a group of logistics and shipping managers and found “cutting transportation costs” to be one of their top challenges. While many shippers naturally look for ways to reduce rates, there is also a broad range of optimization tactics logistics managers can employ to help their businesses realize sustainable long-term savings. Read about 10 shipping optimization tactics you can apply today.

4 Guidelines for Navigating Cargo Freight Claims

Today’s freight industry runs at rapid speeds to meet customer delivery demands. One event that can disrupt the flow of your freight management operations and supply chain is damaged or lost cargo. The majority of shipments are picked-up and delivered on-time and intact, but knowing what to do and who to contact if you need to file a freight claim can be a key differentiator to minimizing downtime. Read about 4 freight claim guidelines that will keep your supply chain operating efficiently.

Trends Impacting Your Logistics Operations in 2018

The logistics industry is evolving, bringing both risk and opportunity to corporate supply chains. Government regulations, the driver squeeze and a healthy GDP have created challenging capacity and rate conditions. The booming e-commerce space and demand for operational efficiency continues to amplify the need for increased automation and technology. Read about three macro trends impacting the freight community.

7 Advantages to Outsourcing Logistics

Today, ninety percent of Fortune 500® companies rely on 3PLs for outsourced logistics and supply chain services, according to an Armstrong & Associates report. Whether you’re a B2C or B2B company, how promptly and efficiently you react to customer orders has a direct bearing on customer loyalty, retention and earnings. Read how outsourcing non-core functions like logistics allows you to focus entirely on what you’re great at: growing and building your business.

Is Your 3PL Adding Value or Just Taking Orders

Companies are putting more emphasis on logistics due to the impact it has on customer loyalty and earnings. At the same time, logistics costs are increasing and transportation management is becoming more complex, digitized and fast-paced. To combat these complexities, companies are looking for logistics service providers that do more than simply book shipments and take orders. Read about how 3PLs that are solution-focused can solve logistics challenges and add value to your supply chain.

Learn how a 3PL can drive overall cost savings and efficiency into your supply chain. Call 866-275-1407 or Contact Us

Companies are putting more emphasis on logistics due to the impact it has on customer loyalty and earnings. At the same time, logistics costs are increasing and transportation management is becoming more complex, digitized and fast-paced.

To combat these complexities, companies are looking for logistics service providers that do more than simply book shipments and take orders. 3PLs that are solution-focused and can solve logistics challenges are pivotal to adding value to a company’s supply chain.

What to Expect from a Solutions-Focused 3PL

Solutions-focused 3PLs move businesses beyond freight transactions, helping them evolve and think strategically about logistics and transportation management. The difference between a transactional and solutions-focused 3PL is like vacation planning. If you’re taking a week-long vacation to Disney World, do you show up at the entrance your first day to buy tickets and book a hotel room, or do you plan in advance to secure the best prices and terms?

The same goes for logistics and freight. If you buy at the last minute, you’re paying a premium on the spot market. Thinking long-term and holistically helps you predict demand so you can secure cost-effective contracts at competitive rates. Solutions-focused 3PLs help you plan, strategize and purchase your transportation in a consultative, collaborative and data-driven way.

A solutions-focused 3PL will provide the following value-added services:

We encourage you to look beyond your freight planning as a series of independent transactions to a well-thought strategy, which will help you become more efficient, improve performance and save money.

Learn how a solution-focused 3PL can drive overall cost savings and efficiency into your supply chain. Request a logistics and freight needs analysis: call 855-444-6608 or contact us.

Did you know that paperwork—bills of lading, certificates of origin, invoices and insurance policies—accompanying most large shipments of goods, accounts for one-fifth of the total transportation costs? Imagine if you could do away with paperwork by digitizing the information and “beaming” it into the cloud where all involved parties could access it any time.

That’s the promise of the blockchain, a technology we’re investing in at GlobalTranz. Wired magazine notes supply chain and logistics transaction documentation to be “one of the potentially most compelling use cases for blockchain technology.” A plethora of startups—as well as major companies like IBM and Walmart—are betting that the technology will change the way goods travel around the world.

A recent Wired magazine article follows the path of a container of avocados from India to the Netherlands that “involves dozens of people and businesses.” In this scenario, reports Wired, “Farmers need to drop off the avocados, boats need to pick them up, regulators need to sign off on the container’s contents, and someone needs to make sure that the fruits haven’t gone bad. Most of these handoffs and communications are still done via analog technology.”

Up to 30 different parties are involved in shipping this one container of avocados. Blockchain technology can digitize the stacks of paperwork that accompany supply chain transactions and push it all to the cloud, where key information is visible to stakeholders within the supply chain. Notes Wired, “That system might live inside a mobile app, and involve other tech, like QR codes, cameras, RFID chips, or internet-connected sensors.”

Smart Contracts and Proving Provenance

The blockchain is a distributed ledger that digitally records transaction history between parties. Information gets stored in blocks of data that are “chained” together. Each data block added to a chain is digitally unique and encrypted with a date/time stamp and key, which makes it unalterable. Information in a blockchain can’t be hacked or counterfeited and is immediately “trusted,” and therefore, accepted by anyone with access to the related blockchain.

This essential trust element is what makes blockchain technology ideal for executing what is known as “smart contracts.” For example, notes Wired, “When that shipment of avocados reaches the port in Amsterdam, it could automatically trigger a payment to the shipper back in India. Smart contracts could also be used to handle the required paperwork since they’re more secure than an emailed PDF and cannot be easily manipulated.” Smart contracts can be enormous time and money savers.

Blockchain tech can also detect fraud and help shippers guarantee the provenance, or authenticity of products. Provenance ensures that every shipped good includes a digital “passport” that proves its authenticity. These so-called passports include essential data such as where and when the product was manufactured and what steps it took throughout its journey.

Future Blockchain Standards Are Essential

Blockchain technology has the potential to drive efficiency, visibility and cost savings into supply chain and logistics management, but full-scale adoption is only possible if we have standards.

Today, BiTA (Blockchain in Transport Alliance) is the vanguard leading blockchain standards creation in the transportation and logistics industry. BiTA is actively working with its members (GlobalTranz is a founding member) investigating use cases and developing a common framework for which the logistics industry can build revolutionary blockchain applications.

Read the complete Wired article for more insights into how blockchain technology will help transform logistics.

Learn more about Blockchain in Logistics.

Deep learning, machine learning and AI

Technologies such as deep learning and artificial intelligence are quickly transforming entire industries, including logistics. Consulting firm McKinsey even says deep learning could one day become “the secret sauce in many different business processes.”

A recent article from the Financial Times shines a light on deep learning, a technology that offers tremendous potential for supply chains and manufacturing. The term itself “refers to the use of artificial neural networks to carry out a form of advanced pattern recognition. Algorithms are trained on large amounts of data, then applied to fresh data that is to be analyzed,” says Richard Waters, the article’s author.

Think of deep learning as a subset of machine learning—a technology GlobalTranz employs within its TMS and other supply chain systems. According to Forbes, “Machine learning takes some of the core ideas of artificial intelligence (AI) and focuses them on solving real-world problems with neural networks designed to mimic our decision-making. Deep Learning focuses even more narrowly on a subset of machine learning tools and techniques, and applies them to solving just about any problem which requires ‘thought’ – human or artificial.”

The Power of Deep Learning in Logistics

One of the most common applications of deep learning and machine learning is an area called predictive analytics. Within the GlobalTranz TMS, deep learning technology is used to help shippers make better decisions. For example, if you’re looking at lane planning, a traditional analytical model would look at a fixed set of assumptions. Analytics based on deep learning can consider dynamic attributes like weather or traffic and self-evolve over time to recognize patterns that humans would not see.

We also use deep learning to help companies track financial forecasts, pace and flow of production, and order processing. These data points, combined with insights into carrier capacity and performance, allow companies to answer questions like, “How many more orders can we service within budget for a given set of lanes? Or how much can we increase manufacturing without going over our freight budget?”

In other areas of the supply chain, experts see more uses of deep learning in: “predictive equipment maintenance, yield optimization, procurement analytics and inventory optimization,” says Mr. Walters, Wired Magazine author.

Companies that are quick to adopt deep learning technologies could also reap gains in value. McKinsey says, “Depending on the industry, the value a company could gain from applying this technology could range from one to nine percent of revenues.”

How Can You Get Involved Without Spending a Fortune?

The good news is for you to take advantage of these emerging, cutting-edge tools, you don’t have to buy the technology. Instead, partner with a 3PL that owns a robust TMS with integrated deep learning and machine learning capabilities. GlobalTranz’s TMS gives users the capabilities they need to employ this nascent technology and deliver more informed suggestions that help automate logistics decisions and drive supply chain efficiency.

 

Learn how you can start using machine learning and deep learning technology in your logistics operations, call 866-275-1407 or Request a TMS Demo.